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Showing posts from October, 2018

Anti-Fast Fashion Outfit and It Costs Under £10

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More environmentally friendly fashion seems daunting. You might think you have to dish out a load of cash on purchasing items made of organic, biodegradable ethically sourced materials. In reality, for the average person on an average wage, this is not feasible. If you have a lot of money and are able to shop at those sorts of shops/brands, then go for it but for me this isn't really an option.  My next best option to avoid fast fashion and the impact it has on the earth is second hand shopping. Whether this is through Ebay and Depop or charity shopping, it's a great way to reduce waste and avoid having clothes dumped in landfill.  If you have followed my blog since the early days (congrats for sticking with me) you will know I love a charity shop and to be honest nothing has changed. Living in Bristol you find some gems in the charity shops and they are often stocked with high street and designer brands.  This whole outfit (apart from the tights) is entirel

The Impact of Your Wardrobe: Why Your Wardrobe Costs the Earth

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I think everyone and their Granny have watched the recent Stacey Dooley documentary on the impact of fast fashion on the Earth and it's been an eye-opener for us all. Ever since starting my journey in cutting down on my plastic use, the concept of how unsustainable the fashion industry is has been looming over me and now I think it's time for me and everyone to face the facts - your wardrobe is costing the Earth.  What is actually happening? The fashion industry is the 2nd most polluting industry after oil. Through overusing water, fossil fuels and toxic chemicals, including dyes. According to Fashion Revolution , if the fashion industry continues on its current path, it could use over 1/4 of the world's carbon budget by 2050.  From the factories to our wardrobes, our clothes have a huge impact on the environment. In the factories, thousands of litres of water go into producing items made out of cotton, which in some places has dried up rivers and vast water